William Edward Lane, Arabic-English Lexicon مدُّ القَامُوس، معجم عربي إنجليزي لوليام إدوارد لَيْن

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عدد المواضيع في هذا الكتاب 4952
415. بيض16 416. بيع19 417. بيلون1 418. بين18 419. بيه3 420. ت4421. تأ1 422. تأر6 423. تأم11 424. تا5 425. تب4 426. تبت7 427. تبر18 428. تبع20 429. تبل16 430. تبن17 431. تبه5 432. تبو2 433. تتر4 434. تجر16 435. تحت9 436. تحف13 437. تحين2 438. تخ4 439. تخت6 440. تخذ10 441. تخرص3 442. تر4 443. ترب18 444. ترج10 445. ترجم6 446. ترح14 447. ترس14 448. ترع16 449. ترف17 450. ترق15 451. ترك16 452. ترما2 453. ترمس10 454. ترن6 455. ترنج2 456. ترنجبين1 457. تره11 458. تسع12 459. تشرين3 460. تع1 461. تعب10 462. تعس16 463. تفث15 464. تفح10 465. تفرق3 466. تفل15 467. تفه16 468. تقد7 469. تقن12 470. تقى2 471. تك2 472. تل4 473. تلأب4 474. تلان3 475. تلب9 476. تلد13 477. تلع14 478. تلف14 479. تلك5 480. تلمذ7 481. تلو13 482. تلى2 483. تم4 484. تمر16 485. تمك9 486. تموز3 487. تن3 488. تنأ11 489. تنر13 490. تنف11 491. تنم9 492. ته3 493. تهر8 494. تهم14 495. تو2 496. توأ1 497. توب15 498. توت10 499. توتيا1 500. توث6 501. توج12 502. توح3 503. تور15 504. توق15 505. تولب1 506. توم13 507. توه7 508. توى6 509. تى1 510. تيا3 511. تيتل1 512. تيح9 513. تير13 514. تيس12 Prev. 100
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 ت alphabetical letter ت

The third letter of the alphabet: called تَآءٌ and تَا

[respecting which latter see the letter ب]: the pl. [of the former is تَآءَاتٌ; and of the latter,] أَتْوَآءُ. (TA in باب الالف الليِنّة.) It is one of the letters termed مَهْمُوسَة [or non-vocal, i. e. pronounced with the breath only, without the voice], and of those termed نِطَعِيَّة [and نِطْعِيَّة and نَطَعِيَّة and نَطْعِيَّة pronounced by pressing the tip of the tongue against the upper gums and suddenly withdrawing it with an emission of the breath]: these latter are ط and د and ت, three letters that are among those which are changed into other letters. (TA at the commencement of باب التآء.)

A2: It is one of the augmentative letters: (S:) and is movent when added at the beginning of a noun, and at the end of a noun, [and at the beginning of a verb,] and at the end of a verb, and is also quiescent at the end of a verb. (Mughnee, K.)

A3: Added at the beginning of a noun, it is a preposition, or particle governing the gen. case, significant of swearing, (S, * Mughnee, K,) and denoting wonder; (Mughnee, K;) and [accord. to general usage] it is peculiarly prefixed to the name اللّٰه; (S, Mughnee, K;) as in تَاللّٰهِ لَقَدْ كَانَ

كَذَا [By God, verily it was thus, or verily such a thing was]; (S;) and تَاللّٰهِ لَأَفْعَلَنَّ كَذَا [By God, I will assuredly do such a thing]: (TA:) but sometimes they said, تَرَبِّى [By my Lord], and تَرَبِّ الكَعْبَةِ [By the Lord of the Kaabeh], and تَالرَّحْمَانِ [By the Compassionate], (Mughnee, K,) as is related on the authority of Akh; deviating from common usage. (TA.) Thus used, it is a substitute for و, (S, Mughnee,) as it is also in تَتْرَى and تُرَاثٌ and تُجَاهَ and تُخَمَةٌ [&c.]; (S;) and the و is a substitute for ب; (S, Mughnee;) but the ت has the additional meaning of denoting wonder: so says Z. (Mughnee.)

A4: Added at the end of a noun, it is a particle of allocution: (Mughnee, K:) it is thus added in أَنْتَ [Thou], (S, Mughnee, K,) addressed to a male, (TA,) and أَنْتِ [Thou], (Mughnee, K,) addressed to a female; (TA;) uniting with the noun, as though the two became one; not being an affixed noun governed in the gen. case. (S.

[See أَنْ.])

A5: It is added in [the beginning of] the second person of the future, (S,) [i. e.,] in the beginning of the aor. , (TA,) [as a particle of allocution,] as in أَنْتَ تَفْعَلُ [Thou dost, or wilt do]. (S, TA.)

b2: It is also added, as a sign of the fem. gender, in the beginning of the future, [or aor. ,] as in هِىَ تَفْعَلُ [She does, or will do]. (S, TA.)

b3: It is also added in the beginning of the third person [fem.] of the [aor. used as an] imperative, [as a sign of the fem. gender,] as in لِتَقُمْ هِنْدُ

[Let Hind stand]. (TA.)

b4: And sometimes it is added in the beginning of the second person of the [aor. used as an] imperative, [as a particle of allocution,] as in the phrase in the Kur [x. 59, accord. to one reading], فَبِذٰلِكَ فَلْتَفْرَحُوا [Therefore therein rejoice ye]: and in the saying of the rájiz, تِئْذَنْ فَإِنِّى حَمْؤُهَا وَجَارُهَا قُلْتُ لِبَوَّابٍ لَدَيْهِ دَارُهَا

[explained in art.اذن]: and [thus] it is added in the beginning of [the second person of] the [aor. used as an] imperative of a verb of which the agent is not named, as in لِتُزْهَ يَا رَجُلُ [Be thou proud, vain, boastful, or self-conceited, O man], from زُهِىَ: but Akh says that the adding of the ل in the beginning of the second person of the [aor. used as an] imperative [except in the case of a pass. verb or a verb of which the agent is not named] is a bad idiom, because the ل is not needed. (S, TA.)

A6: The movent ت added at the end of a verb is a pronoun, as in قُمْتُ [I stood], (Mughnee, K,) and قُمْتَ [Thou stoodest, addressed to a male], and قُمْتِ [Thou stoodest, addressed to a female]: (Mughnee:) thus added in the first and second persons of the pret., it is a pronoun denoting the agent. (S.)

b2: The quiescent ت added at the end of a verb is a sign of the fem. gender, (Mughnee, K,) i. e., a particle applied to denote the fem. gender, (Mughnee,) as in قَامَتْ

[She stood]. (Mughnee, K.) J says [in the S]

that, when thus added at the end of the pret., it is a pronoun: but IB says [correctly] that it is a particle. (TA.)

A7: It is also, sometimes, affixed to ثُمَّ and رُبَّ; and in these cases it is most commonly movent with fet-h, (Mughnee, K,) so that one says ثُمَّتَ and رُبَّتَ. (TA.) [See arts.

ثم and رب.]

A8: تِ is an imperative of أَتَى. (M in art. اتى.)

A9: [As a numeral, ت denotes Four hundred.]
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